Shrub and Hedge Maintenance

We spend around £880,000 on winter pruning and maintenance and with a lengthening growing season (4 weeks longer since 1990) and a maturing landscape we have seen an increase in the need for pruning work.  Areas will be prioritised according to need.

What we do
Areas not covered
Further Information
Frequently asked questions

What we do

Milton Keynes Council is responsible for some of the landscaping of public areas.  Our winter program consists mainly of pruning work to maintain shrubs and hedges, but does not include specialist tree works where a “tree surgeon” would be required to climb one or more trees.

The main pruning period is between November and March and issues that are reported at other times of the year will be scheduled into this work.

The Winter Landscape Maintenance Schedule below shows the estates we maintain and when we expect to conduct the work - issues with landscaping in areas we do not cover should be reported directly to the appropriate Parish/Town Council.

You can Download the 2017/18 Winter Landscape Maintenance Schedule (PDF, 199KB)which shows when we expect to be in an area.
 

Report a shrub maintenance issue

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Areas not covered

The council does not undertake any work on land that is owned by The Parks Trust or the parish councils listed below:

These areas have appointed their own contractors or are undertaking the work themselves and any complaints, compliments or enquiries should be made directly to the respective Town or Parish Councils or the Parks Trust.  Land that is the responsibility of The Parks Trust can be found on the council mapping system “My MK”

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Further Information

The council's mapping system “My MK”  can show which land is maintained by the Parks Trust or the Council.

The schedules show indicative dates for areas when the winter pruning will be undertaken.

This is subject to change for the following:

  • Some areas may take longer or be undertaken quicker than shown.  
  • Weather conditions, such as snow, may suspend the operation.  Equally very wet conditions may mean that there is no access for the machinery.  High winds and other extreme weather conditions may mean that the landscape resources are diverted to deal with emergencies such as clearing snowfall or removing broken branches and fallen trees.

Not all trees, shrubs and hedges require an annual prune.  Some operations, such as coppicing, where the planting is cut back for horticultural purposes (to allow the planting to regenerate and make new growth) may be many years apart.

Not all landscaping is maintained by the Council.  Some will be maintained by businesses (such as in shopping or commercial areas) or householders.

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Frequently asked questions

  • I know the shrubs will grow again but what about my security/privacy?

Landscape plantings were never designed to act as a security or privacy barrier but were planted to soften the built environment. Plants are living, ever-changing organisms and consequently do not have the static qualities, such as those of a fence, required for such a purpose.

  • Can you cut the shrubs back near my house as they collect dust and I believe they're contributing to my asthma?

If anything the opposite will be true. Air quality can be improved through the use of trees, shrubs, and grass. Leaves filter the air we breathe by removing dust and other particulates. Rain then washes the pollutants to the ground. Leaves absorb carbon dioxide from the air to form carbohydrates that are used in the plant’s structure and function. In this process, leaves also absorb other air pollutants-such as ozone, carbon monoxide and sulphur dioxide as well as giving off oxygen.

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Report a shrub maintenance issue

Last Updated: 16 November 2017